Adjust the laptop's screen brightness in Emacs

Adjust the screen brightness in Emacs If you're using i3wm on Linux, how do you adjust the laptop's screen brightness? Most of the time, I use the laptop with an external monitor. But when I am out, I have no monitors. And it seems no easy way to adjust the brightness in i3wm. Being too bright or dim is terrible for the eyes. Recently, I found a command-line tool called brightnessctl, which can adjust the brightness in a terminal. [Read More]

Send Notifications from Emacs with i3wm and Dunst

I barely use notifications, but recently I think it's a valuable way to remind me things like helping me nurture habits, or to notify me of emergencies like a critically low laptop battery. So I try to integrate notifications to org-mode and Emacs today. The org-notify package from org-contrib (install it by (package-install 'org-contrib) ) could do this job easily before, so I first test it in the minibuffer with (org-notify "test"). [Read More]

Manage SSH Connections with ~/.ssh/config

I used to manage SSH connection with such GUI apps as MobaXterm, when I wrote code on Windows at work. As I changed my workflow to use a tiling window manager in a VirtualBox guest OS, I continued to improve my way of managing SSH connections, which I want to share here if you don't know yet. At first, I baked a helper Python script, which I named as qssh for "quick ssh", to help me assemble ssh arguments for me(such as username, Ip, port, etc. [Read More]

Start a New Terminal(urxvt) at Current Buffer's default-directory on Emacs

I have been really enjoying the more concentration workflow qtile, a tiling window manager, brings me, since I started using it a few months ago. I am more focus on the current task now as all the windows I care about are laid out on the same screen. As I get more used to qtile at every day's work, I noticed that I became more depend on short-life terminal sessions. [Read More]

How To Run Bleeding-edge Qtile Within a Virtualenv

For having been using GNOME for quite a long time, I was considering trying some tiling window managers to see what it's like a few weeks ago. Along the way, I found a nice window manager written in Python: Qtile, what interests me most is that it's a hackable window manager, which makes it flexible to extend or change its behaviors. Well, switching to use a tiling window manager is far simpler than I thought. [Read More]